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Monday, January 25, 2021 - 4:00pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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This meeting will walk the treasurers of Newcomb-sponsored student organizations through the entire budget process: what to consider when creating your budget, how to create a strong budget, and what the submission process will look like. It will be recorded for those who cannot attend live. 

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 5:30pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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This workshop for Newcomb student organization leaders and Fireworks (second-year Spark students) will focus on group dynamics and conflict resolution. RSVP required to attend. 

Monday, February 1, 2021 - 12:30pm

Uptown Campus
The Commons, 3rd Floor
43 Newcomb Place Suite 301, New Orleans, Louisiana, 43 Newcomb Place, New Orleans, Louisiana

Happy Mardi Gras! Come by the Newcomb Institute courtyard (3rd floor of the Commons) for free grab-and-go king cake and cookies from Viola's Heritage Breads, a business rooted in honoring the contributions of people of color in the food world. Co-sponsored by New Student & Leadership Programs. 

Friday, February 5, 2021 - 11:00am

Uptown Campus
Online
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2021 Newcomb Institute Postdoctoral Fellows Symposium
Newcomb Institute of Tulane University
Via Zoom
February 5, 2021, 11am-5:15pm
 
To register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2021-newcomb-institute-postdoctoral-fellows...
Zoom link and papers for discussion will be sent to registered attendees on January 27, 2021
 
This day-long symposium provides an opportunity for postdoctoral fellows affiliated with Newcomb Institute to engage with distinguished scholars in their field around their work. The research conducted by the postdoctoral fellows underscores the importance of intersectionality in shaping discussions of law, governance, civil rights, and everyday movement. 
 
This year’s symposium consists of three sessions, each of which includes a discussion between one Newcomb postdoctoral fellow, two distinguished scholars, and the audience. The fellows have prepared papers for these sessions, which will be made available to audience members who register in advance. Audience members are welcome to attend one or all of the panels as their schedule permits.
 
The symposium also includes a Fridays at Newcomb event from 1-2pm featuring a talk by Khiara M. Bridges.
 
Schedule:
 
11:00-11:10: Welcome by Professor Sally J. Kenney, Executive Director of Newcomb Institute
 
11:10-12:40: Annie McGlynn-Wright, Andrea Freeman, and Khiara M. Bridges, a conversation about Dr. McGlynn-Wright’s paper, “Inspecting the Expecting: How Race, Pregnancy, and Poverty Shaped the WIC Program.”
  
1:00-1:55: Fridays at Newcomb, Khiara M. Bridges keynote talk
 
2:00-3:30: Tiffany Gonzalez, Maria Cotera, and Max Krochmal, a conversation about Dr. Gonzalez’s paper, “Chicanas and Political Leadership.”
 
3:45-5:15: Jess Issacharoff, Victoria Law and Michelle Jones, a conversation about Dr. Issacharoff’s paper, “Domestic Terror: Assata Shakur and the Birth of Rikers Women’s Facility.”
 
Participant Biographies: 
 
Khiara M. Bridges is a professor of law at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has written many articles concerning race, class, reproductive rights, and the intersection of the three. She is also the author of three books: Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization (2011), The Poverty of Privacy Rights (2017), and Critical Race Theory: A Primer (2019).
 
Maria Cotera is an associate professor in the Mexican American and Latino Studies Department at the University of Texas. She is author of Native Speakers: Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the Poetics of Culture, (University of Texas Press, 2008), which received the Gloria Anzaldúa book prize for 2009 from the National Women's Studies Association (NWSA). Her edited volume (with Dionne Espinoza and Maylei Blackwell), Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Feminism and Activism in the Movement Era(University of Texas Press, 2018) has been adopted in courses across the country.
 
Andrea Freeman is Professor of Law at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She writes and researches at the intersection of critical race theory and food policy, health, and consumer credit. Much of her work explores her pioneering theory of food oppression, which examines how facially neutral food-related law and policy, influenced by corporate interests, disproportionately harm marginalized communities. She is the author of Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice and the recipient of the 2020-21 Fulbright King's College London US Scholar Award.
 
Tiffany Gonzalez is the Bonquois Postdoctoral Fellow in Women’s History at the Newcomb Institute. Currently, she is working on her manuscript-in-progress, Representation for a Change: How Chicanas Transformed American Politics in the Twentieth Century, which underscores the Chicana fight for political representation in government and electoral politics. She earned her PhD in History from Texas A&M University.
 
Jess Issacharoff is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Law and Society at the Newcomb Institute. She received a PhD in Literature with a certificate in Feminist Studies from Duke University.
 
Michelle Jones is a third-year doctoral student in the American Studies program New York University. She is interested in excavating the collateral consequences of criminal convictions for people and families directly impacted by mass incarceration, in addition to participating in a scholarly project challenging the narratives of the history of women’s prison with a group of incarcerated scholars. She is a founding member and chair of the board of Constructing Our Future, a reentry alternative for women created by incarcerated women in Indiana. 
 
 
Sally J. Kenney has served as director of the Newcomb Institute and held the Newcomb endowed chair since 2010. She is a faculty member in the Political Science Department and an affiliated faculty member in the law school. Her research interests include sexual assault on campus, women’s imprisonment, women and leadership, gender and judging, judicial selection, feminist social movements, women and electoral politics, the European Court of Justice, exclusionary employment policies, and pregnancy discrimination. Her latest book is Gender and Justice: Why Women in the Judiciary Really Matter.
 
Max Krochmal is a scholar-activist and writer based in Fort Worth, Texas. He is A.M.  Pate, Jr., Associate Professor of History and was the founding chair of the Department of Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies at Texas Christian University. He is the author of Blue Texas: The Making of a Multiracial Democratic Coalition in the Civil Rights Era (University of North Carolina Press, 2016), winner of the Organization of American Historians’ Frederick Jackson Turner Award, the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies Tejas Foco Non-Fiction Book Award, and other prizes. He is also co-editor of Civil Rights in Black and Brown: Histories of Resistance and Struggle in Texas (University of Texas Press, forthcoming, November, 2021) and directs the oral history project undergirding the volume. In the community, Krochmal co-chairs the Fort Worth Independent School District Racial Equity Committee and serves on the board of United Fort Worth, a multiracial grassroots community organization. In 2021-22, he will assume the Fulbright-García Robles Chair of U.S. Studies at the Universidad de las Américas, Puebla, México. A native of Reno, Nevada, he majored in Community Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, before earning graduate degrees in History at Duke University.
 
Victoria Law is a freelance journalist whose work focuses on the intersections of incarceration, gender and resistance. She is the author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women, co-author of Prison By Any Other Name: The Harmful Consequences of Popular Reforms, and co-editor of Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities. Her writings about incarceration have appeared in various on-line and print outlets, including The New York Times, The Nation, Wired, Ms. Magazine, and Truthout. She is a co-founder of Books Through Bars—NYC, an all-volunteer program that sends free books to people imprisoned across the country, and was the long-time editor of the zine Tenacious: Art and Writings by Women in Prison. She lives in New York City with her daughter.
 
Annie McGlynn-Wright is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Law and Society at the Newcomb Institute. She holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of Washington. Her fellowship is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.
 
 

Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 3:00pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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Faculty, staff, and students are welcome to join the discussion of Leigh Goodmark's Decriminalizing Domestic Violence: A Balanced Policy Approach to Intimate Partner Violence.
Decriminalizing Domestic Violence asks the crucial, yet often overlooked, question of why and how the criminal legal system became the primary response to intimate partner violence in the United States. The book examines how social, legal, and financial resources are diverted into a criminal legal apparatus that is often unable to deliver justice or safety to victims or to prevent intimate partner violence in the first place.  The book challenges readers to understand intimate partner violence not solely, or even primarily, as a criminal law concern but as an economic, public health, community, and human rights problem. It also argues that only by viewing intimate partner violence through these lenses can we develop a balanced policy agenda for addressing it. At a moment when we are examining our national addiction to punishment, Decriminalizing Domestic Violence offers a thoughtful, pragmatic roadmap to real reform.
Please email jqiu@tulane.edu for Zoom passcode.

Wednesday, March 3, 2021 - 6:00pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions and Lost Children Archive. She is the recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship and the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, The Carnegie Medal, an American Book Award,  and has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kirkus Prize, and the Booker Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation "5 Under 35" honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney's, among other publications, and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She is a Writer in Residence at Bard College and lives in New York City.  
 
The Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence Program brings renowned woman writers to the Tulane campus. Coordinated through the Newcomb Institute, the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program was established by Dana Zale Gerard, NC ‘85, and made possible by an annual gift from the M.B. and Edna Zale Foundation of Dallas, Texas. Since 2006, the program has been generously supported by Barnes & Noble College Booksellers. In 2010, the program became fully endowed through a gift from Martha McCarty Kimmerling, NC’63, and known as the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program.

Tuesday, March 23, 2021 - 6:00pm

Online

Join us for an evening with Elizabeth Acevedo.
Acevedo presents her third book, Clap When You Land, and discusses her writing process and performance background. The discussion will be followed by a reading.
Poet, novelist, and National Poetry Slam Champion, Elizabeth Acevedo was born and raised in New York City, the only daughter of Dominican immigrants. Her poetry is infused with Dominican bolero and her beloved city’s tough grit. She is the author of Clap When You Land, (Quill Tree Books, 2020); With the Fire On High, (Harper, 2019); the New York Times best selling and award-winning novel, The Poet X. (HarperCollins, 2018), winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Adult Fiction, the 2019 Michael L. Printz Award, and the Carnegie Medal; and the poetry chapbook Beastgirl & Other Origin Myths. (YesYes Books, 2016), a collection of folkloric poems centered on the historical, mythological, gendered and geographic experiences of a first generation American woman. From the border in the Dominican Republic, to the bustling streets of New York City, Acevedo considers how some bodies must walk through the world as beastly beings. How these forgotten myths are both blessing and birthright.
Acevedo is the winner the Horn Book Prize for Fiction and Poetry for The Poet X. The Horn Book Magazine review of the novel calls Acevedo’s debut verse novel “an arresting portrait of a young poet coming into her own.” They write: “Fifteen-year-old Xiomara, whose name means “one who is ready for war,” has been fighting her whole life… In nearly every poem, there is at least one universal truth about adolescence, family, gender, race, religion, or sexuality that will have readers either nodding in grateful acknowledgment or blinking away tears. ‘It almost feels like / the more I bruise the page / the quicker something inside me heals.’” In another review, Justina Ireland observes: “This book crackles with energy and snaps with authenticity and voice. Every poem in this stunningly addictive and deliciously rhythmic verse novel begs to be read aloud. Xiomara is a protagonist who readers will cheer for at every turn. As X might say, Acevedo’s got bars. Don’t pass this one by.”
This online program is free and open to the public. It is part of our ongoing series of public engagement programs with Latinx writers that explore Latin America, race, and identity. Read more about Acevedo’s work in this recent article from The Atlantic.
In partnership with the Center for the Gulf South and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - 3:00pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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Faculty, staff, and students are welcome to join in the discussion of Cathleen D. Cahill's Recasting the Vote: How Women of Color Transformed the Suffrage Movement.
We think we know the story of women’s suffrage in the United States: women met at Seneca Falls, marched in Washington, D.C., and demanded the vote until they won it with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. But the fight for women's voting rights extended far beyond these familiar scenes. From social clubs in New York’s Chinatown to conferences for Native American rights, and in African American newspapers and pamphlets demanding equality for Spanish-speaking New Mexicans, a diverse cadre of extraordinary women struggled to build a movement that would truly include all women, regardless of race or national origin. In Recasting the Vote, Cathleen D. Cahill tells the powerful stories of a multiracial group of activists who propelled the national suffrage movement toward a more inclusive vision of equal rights. With feminists of color in the foreground, Cahill recasts the suffrage movement as an unfinished struggle that extended beyond the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.
Please email jqiu@tulane.edu for Zoom passcode.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021 - 3:00pm

Uptown Campus
Online
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Faculty, staff, and students are welcome to join our discussion of this month's Women, Law, and History reading group.  
“Women Don’t Get AIDS, They Just Die From It”: Law, Science, and Feminism in an Epidemic by Aziza Ahmed, forthcoming Cambridge University Press
In 2004, the United Nations Joint Program on HIV/AIDS declared the AIDS epidemic had been “feminized.” How did women come to be seen as “at-risk” in the epidemic? Against a linear narrative of scientific discovery and progress, Aziza Ahmed argues that it was women’s rights lawyers and activists that fundamentally altered the legal and scientific response to the epidemic by mobilizing law to alter the scientific consensus on who was at risk for contracting HIV. Their goal was to shift the distribution of AIDS resources towards women. In doing so, advocates not only changed the legal governance of AIDS, they altered the scientific trajectory of the epidemic.