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The Geechee Seminoles

Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 11:00am

Uptown Campus
Recital Hall, Dixon Performing Arts Annex

The Geechee Seminoles: Gullah Geechee Ingredients in Jazz
Bassist Melvin Gibbs and percussionist David Pleasant, known as the Geechee Seminoles, will give two events on campus on April 23, 2019 on the Gullah Geechee musical elements in jazz and popular music. The Gullah Geechee nation is an Afro-diasporic community from the sea islands near the coast of Georgia and South Carolina.
Melvin Gibbs is an bass player and record producer who has appeared on around 200 albums in diverse genres of music. Time Out New York Magazine dubbed him “the world’s greatest bassist”. The New York Times cited him in their “Best Jazz Performances of 2017” and NPR recognized him for the same in 2018. He has played bass in electric free jazz, funk, hip-hop, world music and punk/metal bands, with artists such as Bill Frisell, Henry Rollins, John Zorn, Marc Ribot, Bernie Worrell (of Parliament Funkadelic and Talking Heads fame), Arto Lindsay, Caetano Veloso, Marisa Monte, Femi Kuti and Eddie Palmieri. He currently plays with his band Harriet Tubman.
David Pleasant, Drumfolk Riddim Specialist, creates volatile polyrhythmic admixtures featuring Gullah-Geechee inspired tradition. It is in that music=movement culture that ring play, Ring Shout, juba, hand jive, work songs and more, break conventional aesthetic boundaries. In it vibration, sound, community and freedom reveal the practical and conceptual power of Indigenous culture. A choreographer, composer, independent scholar and published writer, Pleasant is a Drum-folk master and true Griot of the present. Born in Savannah Georgia, and raised on Sapelo Island and in Darien, Ga. , Pleasant has spent over 30+ years introducing Gullah-Geechee (early African American culture) to national and international participants. 
The Geechee Seminoles will give two presentation/performances. They are both free and open to the public, taking place in Dixon Recital Hall (Dixon Annex 152) at 11:00 am and 7:00 pm on the campus of Tulane University.

That's what she said - Choral Concert

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 - 7:00pm

Uptown Campus
Bass Choral Hall, 2nd Floor Dixon Performing Arts Annex

The Tulane-Newcomb Choir presents
That's what she said: a snapshot of women in choral music
featuring settings of the work of Sarah Teasdale and Anne Bradstreet, and compositions by Fanny  Mendelssohn Hensel, Gwyneth Walker, Chen Yi, and Hildegard von Bingen.

Jazz at the Rat - The Music of Duke Ellington

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 - 7:00pm

Uptown Campus
City Diner in the LBC

The Newcomb Department of Music furthers its mission of introducing students to New Orleans culture with Jazz at the Rat, a series of concerts held in City Diner (aka Der Rathskeller or The Rat), on the garden level of the Lavin-Bernick Center (LBC). Hosted and curated by jazz pianist and Newcomb Department of Music professor Jesse McBride, each live performance features accomplished New Orleans musicians, jazz legends, and visiting artists, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's Jazz Studies program. All concerts are free and open to the public.
For more information, contact Arynne Fannin, Newcomb Department of Music, at afannin@tulane.edu or 504-865-5267. Click here for driving directions to City Diner.
Presented by The Lagniappe Series and Newcomb-Tulane College.

Jazz at the Rat - Tribute to Roy Hargrove

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 7:00pm

Uptown Campus
City Diner in the LBC

The Newcomb Department of Music furthers its mission of introducing students to New Orleans culture with Jazz at the Rat, a series of concerts held in City Diner (aka Der Rathskeller or The Rat), on the garden level of the Lavin-Bernick Center (LBC). Hosted and curated by jazz pianist and Newcomb Department of Music professor Jesse McBride, each live performance features accomplished New Orleans musicians, jazz legends, and visiting artists, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's Jazz Studies program. All concerts are free and open to the public.
For more information, contact Arynne Fannin, Newcomb Department of Music, at afannin@tulane.edu or 504-865-5267. Click here for driving directions to City Diner.
Presented by The Lagniappe Series and Newcomb-Tulane College.

Jazz at the Rat - Khari Allen Lee

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 7:00pm

Uptown Campus
City Diner in the LBC

The Newcomb Department of Music furthers its mission of introducing students to New Orleans culture with Jazz at the Rat, a series of concerts held in City Diner (aka Der Rathskeller or The Rat), on the garden level of the Lavin-Bernick Center (LBC). Hosted and curated by jazz pianist and Newcomb Department of Music professor Jesse McBride, each live performance features accomplished New Orleans musicians, jazz legends, and visiting artists, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's Jazz Studies program. All concerts are free and open to the public.
For more information, contact Arynne Fannin, Newcomb Department of Music, at afannin@tulane.edu or 504-865-5267. Click here for driving directions to City Diner.
Presented by The Lagniappe Series and Newcomb-Tulane College.

Jazz at the Rat - Tribute to Todd Duke, featuring Peter Harris

Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 7:00pm

Uptown Campus
City Diner in the LBC

The Newcomb Department of Music furthers its mission of introducing students to New Orleans culture with Jazz at the Rat, a series of concerts held in City Diner (aka Der Rathskeller or The Rat), on the garden level of the Lavin-Bernick Center (LBC). Hosted and curated by jazz pianist and Newcomb Department of Music professor Jesse McBride, each live performance features accomplished New Orleans musicians, jazz legends, and visiting artists, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's Jazz Studies program. All concerts are free and open to the public.
For more information, contact Arynne Fannin, Newcomb Department of Music, at afannin@tulane.edu or 504-865-5267. Click here for driving directions to City Diner.
Presented by The Lagniappe Series and Newcomb-Tulane College.

Rethinking School Shooters: Queer Futures, Gay Panic, and the Right to Victimization, a Lecture by Dr. Rachel Levitt

Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 3:00pm

Uptown Campus
Anna Many Lounge, Caroling Richardson Building

Rethinking School Shooters: Queer Futures, Gay Panic, and the Right to Victimization
A lecture by Dr. Rachel Levitt, Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at Kansas State University
3:30pm on March 28, 2019
Anna Many Lounge, Caroline Richardson Building
Some of the most well-known school shooting cases have used the legal defense that the shooter was justified because he was retaliating against the homophobic bullying he endured. However, unlike the bullying cases that center young gay people's experiences with homophobic harassment, these school shooters' defenses require a different relationship to sexuality, race, and gender. In this talk, Rachel Levitt will highlight three school shooter cases and what they reveal about the law, homophobia, racism, and who is seen as a victim. 
Rachel Levitt is an Assistant Professor in the Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Department at Kansas State University. Dr. Levitt earned their PhD in American Studies from the University of New Mexico with dual graduate certificates in Women Studies, and Race and Social Justice. Their research focuses on the subjects of queer liberation and places those subject formations into historical, social, and legal context. 
This lecture is sponsored by Newcomb College Institute and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

In the Shadows of Slavery and Colonialism: A Symposium on Intersectionality and the Law

Friday, February 8, 2019 - 8:30am

Uptown Campus
Anna Many Lounge, Caroline Richardson Building, 62 Newcomb Place

Featuring Dorothy Roberts of the University of Pennsylvania, Marisa J. Fuentes of Rutgers University, and Deirdre Cooper Owens of Queens College of the City University of New York.  
Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University
Anna Many Lounge, Caroline Richardson Building
Tulane University, New Orleans
We would like to invite the Tulane and New Orleans communities to join Newcomb College Institute (NCI) for this day-long symposium, which provides an opportunity for researchers affiliated with NCI to engage with distinguished scholars in their field around the legal and political legacies of slavery and colonialism through an intersectional lens.  
The researchers for the 2019 symposium are scholars who have been NCI postdoctoral fellows in the past two years. The Symposium theme was selected based on shared issues in the work of these researchers. They are Dr. Bonnie Lucero of the University of Houston and Dr. Emma Shakeshaft of the ACLU of Wisconsin, both of whom were Law & Society Fellows at NCI from 2017-2018, and Dr. Maria R. Montalvo, NCI’s 2018-2019 Bonquois Fellow in Women’s History in the Gulf South.
NCI has been awarded a Carol Lavin Bernick Faculty Grant from Tulane to host this inaugural symposium with the hope and intention that it will become a biennial event.  In 2016 the Carol Lavin Bernick Family Foundation initiated this unique grant program to support the research and teaching of Tulane faculty.
This year’s symposium will consist of three sessions, each of which includes a discussion between one NCI researcher, her chosen distinguished scholar, and the audience.  The researchers will prepare papers in advance for these sessions. (RSVP below to receive copies of pre-circulated materials.)
The symposium will also include a Fridays at Newcomb lunchtime panel with all three invited scholars. The panel will be moderated by Tulane Professor Laura Rosanne Adderley and will explore the usefulness of intersectionality as a theoretical framework for revealing the legacies of slavery and colonialism. Fridays at Newcomb is a lecture series with speakers across disciplines that provides students with the opportunity to learn about subjects outside of their majors. Lunch is provided at every Fridays at Newcomb lecture and they are each free and open to the public.
The schedule will be as follows:
8:30-8:45am - Tulane President Michael Fitts has been invited to give opening remarks
8:45 – 10:00 am – Bonnie Lucero and Deirdre Cooper Owens, a conversation about Dr. Lucero’s paper, “Reproducing Racial Hierarchy in Cuba’s Slave Society.” RSVP recommended.
10:15 – 11:30am – Emma Shakeshaft and Dorothy Roberts, a conversation about Dr. Shakeshaft’s paper, “Race, Membership, and Sovereignty: the Benefits of Using a Comparative Approach When Analyzing Race in Transracial Adoption Cases.“ RSVP recommended.
12:00pm – 1:00pm – Fridays at Newcomb, “In the Shadows of Slavery and Colonialism: The Uses of Intersectionality,“ Dorothy Roberts, Marisa Fuentes, and Deirdre Cooper Owens, moderated by Laura Rosanne Adderley, Associate Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Tulane University
1:30pm – 2:45 – Maria R. Montalvo and Marisa J. Fuentes, a conversation about Dr. Montalvo’s paper, “The Burden of Proof: Race, Freedom, and Litigation in the 1800s.”  RSVP recommended.
RSVP Information
In order to ensure the highest quality of engagement with each scholar’s work, NCI will collect RSVPs and will make the research essays available in advance to those who plan to attend the symposium sessions.  Note that no RSVP is necessary for attendance at the Fridays at Newcomb lunchtime panel. 
RSVP Here

Newcomb College Institute Info Session

Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 1:00pm

Uptown Campus
7025 Freret Street

Come to an NCI Information Session to learn more about the NCI summer internship grant, research grants, PLEN grants, the NCI Women to Women Mentoring Program, and more. The sessions are at the NCI House (7025 Freret) on the second floor in the Wisdom Dining Room.

Fridays at Newcomb: Regina Kunzel

Friday, February 1, 2019 - 12:00pm

Uptown Campus
Anna Many Lounge

Title: “In Treatment: Psychiatry and the Archives of Modern Sexuality”
Bio: Regina Kunzel holds the Doris Stevens Chair and is Professor of History and Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University. Her work focuses on histories of sexuality in carceral spaces, and on the twined histories of sexual deviance and normalcy. Kunzel’s most recent book, Criminal Intimacy: Prison and the Uneven History of Modern American Sexuality (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008), received many awards including the Lambda Literary Award, the American Historical Association’s John Boswell Prize, and the MLA’s Alan Bray Memorial Book Award. She is also the author of Fallen Women, Problem Girls: Unmarried Mothers and the Professionalization of Social Work, 1890 to 1945 (Yale Univ. Press, 1993), as well as articles on transgender studies, disability studies, the history of prison sexual culture, single pregnancy, and gender and professionalization. Kunzel has received fellowships from the ACLS, the
National Endowment for the Humanities, the Stanford Humanities Center, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

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